Sunday, February 17, 2008

Because They Have More Guns


Ultimately, Might Makes Right

Apelike humans "have faith" that they are able to create a society capable of surviving their baser instincts, but the question is - is that even possible?

Some look at isolated examples of human cruelty and say, it's the exception, most people wouldn't act that way, but others believe human beings are deeply flawed creatures with primitive instincts which lead even the best of people in the best of times to seek to dominate, and destroy others.


NAZI Poster - Germany Had A Solution For Disabled - Sterilize & Euthanize

The thin blue line which separates civilized society from chaos is manned by an army of hard working dedicated professionals who make our streets safe by enforcing our laws, but sometimes even those charged with keeping the law, and maintaining the order reveal their own animal nature.


Good Cops Need More Training And More Pay - Bad Cops Need Firing

Our institutions are after all held together ultimately by force, or the threat of force, and in the end it is who has the bigger guns which determines what is considered acceptable, and what is not. This inescapable conclusion may not make us feel good about ourselves, but it does demand a response. What kind of people do we want making, and enforcing our laws?

1 comment:

rickmonday said...

JP,

Very interesting topic and I am afraid it is right on. I have been trying to come up with a way to counter your hypothesis and cannot.

On a macro level,I thought at first that trade might be the answer but upon further pondering, I realized that ultimately even that fails. I know Japan attacked the US during WWII due to our economic sanctions, basically an oil embargo. But in the very end, the guy with the bigger guns wins. Now economics can play a part in disallowing someone to build the proper weapons systems so it does play a part (look at the fall of the Soviet Union.)

email jp

  • jeromeprophet@gmail.com

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